HAVOC Gallery


27 Sears Lane

VT 05401 Burlington

United States

Phone : 800-639-1868

Fax :

Mobile Ph. : 802-863-9553

URL : HAVOCGallery.com

Burlington

United States

Phone :

Fax :

Mobile Ph. :

URL :

MacDonald Bruce R.   ()

Vogelsang-Card Sarah   ()

About

HAVOC Gallery with its eighteen foot ceilings and massive doors for natural light exhibits fine art by Joël Urruty, Mandy Daniels, George Peterson, Gordon Auchincloss, John Rose, Sam Stark, Susan Madacsi and Bruce R. MacDonald; Large, Precise and Multidimensional.

HAVOC Gallery came from Gallery 180 (opened in 2007), the creation of artist Bruce R. MacDonald, to exhibit visionary mid-career artists who create works that exemplify their well honed technique and ascetic of minimalist beauty. When Gallery 180 moved to a more visible location in the heart of Burlington's South End Arts district along Lake Champlain in 2012, Havoc Gallery was born. This unique space allows patrons to be exposed to artwork from very divergent sources curated by experienced professionals.

Marelli - Joël Urruty

Joël Urruty Marelli

Array - Bruce R.  MacDonald

Bruce R. MacDonald Array

Good Fortune Living in Paradise - John Rose

John Rose Good Fortune Living in Paradise

On a Good Day - Bruce R.  MacDonald

Bruce R. MacDonald On a Good Day

Chinese Superman - John Rose

John Rose Chinese Superman

Somerton - Joël Urruty

Joël Urruty Somerton

Red Guardians - Joël Urruty

Joël Urruty Red Guardians
Wood tarnished, silver pigments and concrete
81" x 13" x 10"
2015

Tai Chi Series: Single Whip, Classic Chanel Style - John Rose

John Rose Tai Chi Series: Single Whip, Classic Chanel Style
Poplar wood
28" x 32" x 25"
2015

Scheherazade - Bruce R.  MacDonald

Bruce R. MacDonald Scheherazade

Exhibiting Artists

  • Bruce R. MacDonald  (+)

    Biography : On the outside Bruce R. MacDonald’s work seems like frozen video displays lifted from the walls of some 22nd Century environment; while on the inside they have the detailing and complexity of sun sparkles on the ocean, the diversity of the forest floor, maps of some celestial event or pure abstractions of a particular moment of organic consciousness. Twenty five years of daily metalwork and fifty three years of overactive eyes have led to this continuum. He graduated with a degree in English from Haverford College in 1981 and decided to look for a job where he could make physical objects. “After college I was tired of only having sheets of paper to show for long days of work. With metal, after forty hours, I had something tangible, something that would survive, and something that might be here forever.” Over the next nine years, Bruce took a variety of jobs working with metal including restoring brass and copper antiques, fabricating custom lighting and architectural elements, working with jewelers, and doing large scale iron and steel work. Projects ranged from 300-year-old clock works to a five-story helical stairway. These different jobs helped Bruce refine his aesthetics and build his skills. “Jewelry was too small a scale for me. I didn’t like squinting and large-scale work was too reliant on a crew, so I settled on tabletop work and furniture,” he says. For most of Bruce’s career so far, his focus has been on producing multiples including a helix shaped CD rack, tabletop spacecraft designs, and futuristic-looking champagne and martini glasses. Ever responsive to the customer, he made red and white wine glasses when the martinis sold well and sugar bowls and creamers when the teapot was a hit. As business thrived, worldwide appreciation for Bruce’s work grew. The Museum of Science and Industry in London featured his helix CD rack on the cover of their catalog. His teaship (a teapot that looks like a spaceship) ha

    Detailed Description : These panels are part of an ongoing exploration of mine of the optical properties of abraded metal. I have been doing metalwork for over twenty five years and along the way recognized that some tools leave a surface that seems to recede from the viewer, some simply flatten or create no dimensionality, and some seem to lift off the surface into the space above the metal. By combining these techniques on a surface I can create dramatic effects of depth and space within a two-dimensional object. I have worked to develop a vocabulary of brushwork, tool choices and hand motions which actually create spatial relationships between objects in the artwork. These high grade alloy stainless steel panels are a pure expression of my vision utilizing this ever expanding vocabulary. They are a celebration of the possibilities inherent in this distinctive medium. If one looks at a painting from different vantage points in a room the same painting is always there. If one walks around a sculpture there is a continuously varying perception of the object and this is precisely how one experiences my light sculptures. They change as one’s point of view changes with elements disappearing and reappearing from other places in the room. They also display true parallax with objects in the surface relating to others in consistent relationships which is why our eyes and brain read these surfaces as having depth. The art on the wall is not the piece of metal but that sense one has that some piece of the pattern you see is in front of another. The art is the way your eyes read the space created by the light reflecting off the surface. These panels have effects that are dramatic and immediately apparent and another level of perception that is only apparent with prolonged study. Letting one’s eyes relax and genuinely staring will yield bits of reflected light that curve away and behind other objects, swirls and shimmering lines that lift into the space in front of the surface. Living

    Artist's Objects:

    • Bruce R.  MacDonald - Scheherazade Scheherazade
    • Bruce R.  MacDonald - On a Good Day On a Good Day
    • Bruce R.  MacDonald - Array Array

    Also exhibited by:

    Also represented by:

  • John Rose  (+)

    Detailed Description : John Rose creates grace and elegance within the contours of his abstract sculptures. He uses poplar wood to construct the forms that bear relation to his interest in visual scientific data. Poplar has great malleability and can be bent, molded and twisted into calligraphic like forms. John Rose moved from England to China in 1976 where he taught painting and drawing at the University of Hong Kong while absorbing the shapes, colors and flavors of Asia that inspire his work today. Residing in Los Angeles since 1983, he has exhibited in the US continuously and has achieved international recognition with many corporate commissions around the world including the installation of 16 large scale hanging sculptures in the entrance of The Westin Diplomat in Hollywood, FL.

    Artist's Objects:

    • John Rose - Tai Chi Series: Single Whip, Classic Chanel Style Tai Chi Series: Single Whip, Classic Chanel Style
    • John Rose - Chinese Superman Chinese Superman
    • John Rose - Good Fortune Living in Paradise Good Fortune Living in Paradise

    Also exhibited by:

    Also represented by:

  • Joël Urruty  (+)

    Detailed Description : As an artist I strive to create elegant sculptures that capture the true essence of the subject matter. Form, line and surface are used as the visual language. The figure is abstracted to a minimalist form, void of any superfluous information. The primary material, wood, is often masked by paint to allow the form to take precedence over the material. Monochromatic colors, such as, black or white are often used on the sculptures allowing light and shadow to play off the subtle shifting facets of the sculptures. This is what I do. Why I do it, I don’t really know. I do know that there is something deep inside that drives me to make these things. Things I don’t completely understand myself. But when a piece is finished and it feels right, I know I have done what it was I was suppose to do and move on to the next. Joël Urruty

    Artist's Objects:

    • Joël Urruty - Red Guardians Red Guardians
    • Joël Urruty - Somerton Somerton
    • Joël Urruty - Marelli Marelli

    Also exhibited by:

    Also represented by:

Other Represented Artists