WHAT'S HOT THIS WINTER
2016-2017 EXHIBITION CALENDAR

Hosted by our Museum Partners

PEREZ ART MUSEUM MIAMI

www.pamm.org

Oct. 14, 2016 – June 4, 2018
Susan Hiller: Lost and Found
Susan Hiller (b. 1940, Tallahassee, FL; lives in London) is an influential pioneer of multimedia installation art recognized for her early adoption of video as an artistic medium and for her ability to transform conventional gallery spaces into haunting, immersive environments. Hiller combines the archival tendencies of conceptual art with an emphasis on psychologically charged subjects, from war memorials to paranormal phenomena. Commissioned by Pérez Art Museum Miami and making its debut in this exhibition, Hiller’s video Lost and Found features an audio collage of voices speaking in 23 different languages, including Aramaic, Comanche, Livonian and other extinct or endangered idioms. Many of the anecdotes, songs, arguments, memories, and conversations that the voices relay revolve around the theme of language itself.

Oct. 21, 2016 – April 23, 2017
Project Gallery: SUPERFLEX
This exhibition presents Kwassa Kwassa (2015), a film created by the Danish artist collective, SUPERFLEX. Focusing on small, handmade fishing boats—the kwassa kwassa of the title, which translates to “unstable boat,” their construction, and the voyages they enable, the film is a visual meditation on migration, economy, citizenship, and history. It takes as its subject the Comoro Islands, an archipelago in the Mozambique Channel off the southeastern coast of Africa, comprised of islands that are both independent and under French rule.

Nov. 4, 2016 – June 25, 2017
Project Gallery: Ulla von Brandenburg
Alluding to diverse histories rooted in Western traditions, Ulla von Brandenburg (b. 1974, Karlsruhe, Germany; lives in Paris) makes films, drawings, performances, wall paintings, and installations to create multilayered narratives. Her work often references late 19th century expressionist theater, magic, occultism, pre-Freudian psychoanalysis, color theory, and early 20th century Hollywood cinema to investigate how these “pre-archaic” forms relate to modern-day social norms. She creates her own visual vocabulary, combining a range of media to make immersive installations that reconsider contemporary collective experiences.


PATRICIA AND PHILLIP: FROST ART MUSEUM

frost.fiu.edu

Aug 2016 - Dec 2016
Yuni Kim Lang: COMFORT HAIR
Yuni Kim Lang manipulates textiles to create dynamic sculptures that refer to traditional Korean hair pieces worn by women of high status. These historical hair pieces, also called gache, gained popularity in Korea during the 18th century, signifying the wearer’s social status.

In Comfort Hair, Lang uses the concept of the gache wigs as a way of interpreting her Korean heritage and contemporary societal norms. Her interest lies in how hair has been perceived as a sacred entity throughout the ages, treated as a sign of status, as well as subject to dramatic trends — and how such a thing can convey power and meaning.

Oct 2016 - Jan 2017
Narciso Rodriguez: AN EXERCISE IN MINIMALISM
Narciso Rodriguez: An Exercise in Minimalism, the inaugural couture exhibition at the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, reveals the designer’s rigorous adherence to his exquisite vision and the highly intellectual approach he employs to create pure, sleek and timeless garments. A favorite designer of Michelle Obama, Narciso has also dressed Sarah Jessica Parker and Claire Danes, among other celebrities. But Narciso remains grounded in his art. He draws inspiration from a broad range of sources; experiences, environments, spaces and interactions to guide his vision. His garments are intricate in cut, structure, construction and texture, yet clean and elegant in line.

Oct 2016 - Feb 2017
Pierce, Mark, Morph
Miami is a city synonymous with body transformation. Our city is famous for morphing and embellishing the human body through surgery, piercings, tattoos, and other forms of modification. However, many forms of body modification used today are not unique to Miami or youth culture. Piercings, markings, and other forms of alteration have been practiced across cultures for millennia. In addition, artists today are experimenting with modification to reflect and convey ideas related to justice, identity, environment, and gender.

Pierce, Mark, Morph explores the piercings, markings and cranial modification in Pre-Columbian sculpture drawn from the Jay I. Kislak Foundation Collection juxtaposed with work by contemporary artists who are utilizing the body as canvas. While the methods may be similar physically, the intent and concepts behind modifying the human form differ greatly.


BOCA RATON MUSEUM

www.bocamuseum.org

Sept. 22, 2016–Jan. 8, 2017
JOSE ALVAREZ (D.O.P.A.), KROME
Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A) was born in Venezuela in 1961 and currently lives and works in South Florida. He began his career by making a name for himself through charismatic performances where he "channeled" the 2,000-year-old spirit of a shaman named Carlos in front of live audiences and through media broadcasts that have been viewed by millions of people around the world. These performances were the subject of a video work presented in the 2004 Whitney Biennial, and at a solo exhibition at The Kitchen in New York. Alvarez was detained in Krome Detention Center in Miami for identity theft ...

Oct. 18, 2016-Jan. 8, 2017
HUNGARIAN ART: A CENTURY OF REBELLION & REVIVAL
This exhibition of art from Budapest includes 100 works of art by Hungarian artists, including such figures as André Kertész and László Moholy-Nagy, and provides a fascinating microcosm of the social and political turmoil that was raging across Europe, from the late 19th century, through WWI and WWII to the collapse of the Soviet Era, giving rise to the birth of the avant-garde.

Oct. 18, 2016-Jan. 8, 2017
RPM PROJECT: THE HOUSE INSIDE MY HEAD
Our earliest and most personal moments originate at home, shaping the people we become and the identities we form. For centuries, social conditions have placed women and the roles associated with the feminine character, in the house. Using technology and sculpture as environments, RPM Project focuses on creating monumental narratives from traditionally feminine rituals. In this four-part exhibition, they will create metaphorical realities that address classic dilemmas for women and push the boundaries in today’s feminine culture.